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Horse Sense Business Sense
6919 Meadows Town Road
Marshall, North Carolina 28753

Phone: (828) 683-7304
Fax: (828) 683-6281
E-mail: josie@horsesenseotc.com

 

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Horse Sense Business Sense helps professionals in the many fields of Equine Assisted Practices offer top-level programs in their communities through workshops/trainings, symposiums & conferences, consulting & immersion programs, curriculums, a working student program, and much more.

Over a decade ago, Horse Sense began the journey into becoming a top-notch EAP/EAL facility. We are eager to help other Therapeutic Horsemanship, Equine Assisted Psychotherapy and Equine Assisted Learning programs make it, and make a difference, in their community.

Join the Herd! Learn how Working Together Works!



What's New at Business Sense?

Tuesday
Mar252014

More Than A Mirror: Horses Changing People

Perhaps the best way to demonstrate how horses can create change in people is to tell you a few stories of my own. If you’re into horses long enough, eventually that One Horse shows up in your life: the one who gives you fits, the one who challenges all your supposed experience. The one who makes you realize you don’t know anything. This horse becomes what I call a “Waterloo Horse” unless we seek help and grow beyond our current boundaries. And, sometimes, this is the horse who leads us to unexpected places. 

This is the story of my “Waterloo Horse”.

After taking a few years off from horses for college and grad school while in my 20s, I moved to Texas and officially got back into horses. Susan Denero—or ‘Black-Eyed Sue’—came to me the summer of 1998 as a 4-year-old registered dun paint broodmare. When I saw her for the first time at a horse show, I thought she looked great. Her owners were there to help her acclimate to the show environment. I was so excited to see her that I didn’t stop long enough to consider the twisted-wire snaffle bit they were using—and why they might be using it. It should have been my first clue; it’s the classic “normal” bit for the hard-to-control horse. 

The more important thing to know, however, is Sue was actually my second Waterloo horse. I had sold her predecessor, named Brandy, because I kept hitting one wall after another until finally, out of sheer frustration, I sold her. Of course, I was convinced the issues were Brandy’s fault, not mine. In the back of my mind I suspected differently, but everyone around me knew more, so I listened with relief to their suggestions that I sell her and get another horse more suited to me.  

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Nov122013

Horse Sense "Rallys" to Serve Our Veterans

Horse Sense is proud to provide Therapeutic Riding, and Equine Services to the veterans at our local VA. These gentlemen do not pay one dime for these services. Whether we bring the horses to the VA or the veterans are transported to the farm, the costs are covered by grants and donations. We know that grants are not always renewed and that harder times make it difficult to expect regular donations.

But, we know that we make SUCH A DIFFERENCE for these veterans. We know that studies show that veterans who work with horses show a 29% decrease in the risk of violence and a 62% decrease in the risk of suicide.

We are undertaking this fund-raising project to support existing programs and to start NEW programs for families, kids of vets, spouses, homeless vets, and more...

And so we RALLY. We reach out to you - our friends and colleagues - to join with us to keep these services going and to expand them if possible. Please consider a donation of any size so that we may continue to serve these men who have served their country so well.

How does your donation help these Veterans? 

  • $175 supports a Therapeutic Riding session for 2-4 Veterans
  • $275 supports a two-hour Equine Assisted Learning Group at Horse Sense for about 20 Veterans
  • $475 supports three horses visiting the VA, bringing smiles to everyone's faces
  • $725 supports a small group of Veterans in Therapeutic Horsemanship for a day
  • $1170 provides 8-10 sessions of Trauma-Focused Equine Assisted Psychotherapy for two-three Veterans

Why These Programs are Important
There is an incredible need for these programs. Horses make it possible for veterans to talk about their issues and see that there is a way forward - all of this without having someone constantly asking "how do you feel" and "what do you think". Horses make no judgments, and they allow these men and women to recognize themselves in the behavior of the horses, and then apply the lessons learned to their own lives.

WAYS YOU CAN HELP:

Donate directly to Horse Sense via Rally.org. 
Click here to make a donation of any amount directly into the Horse Sense Veterans Fund! 

Donate (and get a tax-deduction!) through Equinox Horse Foundation
Horse Sense's Sister non-profit, Equinox Horse Foundation, has received word about their 501c3 status, and you can now donate to Horse Sense Scholarship Fund through Equinox! Make checks payable to Equinox Horse Foundation, with "Horse Sense Vets" in the memo field, and mail to Lori Araki, 7041 Meadows Town Roa d, Marshall, NC 28753!

Donate your time!
We always need extra support staff when serving our older Veterans in Therapeutic Riding, usually on Wednesdays in the morning. Can you donate an hour or two to give back? 

Monday
Aug192013

More Than a Mirror: Horsemanship in the EAP/EAL Setting

How do we bring Horsemanship into session with clients? One model we’ve offered utilizes the complete treatment team comprised of a mental health professional and an Equine Specialist. In such cases, the client, the mental health professional and the horse professional each have a horse they are playing with in each session. At least one of the team members—typically the ES—is skilled at the activity; the team and the clients then practice/play together. This often looks like a “Can you...” play session, similar to the basketball game called, oddly enough, H-O-R-S-E, in which one of the team members does something with the horse, like weave through cones, and the others are invited to do the same. This is often a very fun and playful experience!

The triad of client, mental health professional (who’s not necessarily good at the horse activity!) and horse professional (who is hopefully pretty good with the activity!) can be really effective in that it provides a shoulder-to-shoulder approach to problem-solving. This is a wonderful opportunity for the client to see persevering behavior modeled in someone else, either the mental health professional or the ES, in a positive way. The ES may play with a particularly young or green horse in such a session, while the client and mental health professional may play with more polished horses. With the whole-team approach, the client has an opportunity to feel less scrutinized and more included.

Another method involves transitioning the client to work with a completely new horse professional (not the same ES from the therapy session work), without a mental health professional present. In such situations,...

Click to read more ...